ANNE ZIEGLER AND WEBSTER BOOTH

ANNE ZIEGLER AND WEBSTER BOOTH
ALL MATERIAL ON THIS SITE IS MY COPYRIGHT. DO NOT COPY IT FOR ANY PURPOSE WHATSOEVER WITHOUT OBTAINING MY PERMISSION! Webster Booth (tenor - 1902-1984) and Anne Ziegler (soprano - 1910-2003) were best known in Britain as duettists on the Variety circuit from 1940 to 1955. During that time they rose rapidly to fame and were frequently heard and seen on radio, records, television, film and stage. Besides this Variety Act, Webster Booth was one of the foremost tenors of his generation and continued to sing in numerous oratorios throughout his career on the Variety circuit. Join The Golden Age of Webster Booth-Anne Ziegler and Friends on Facebook.

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

ANNE ZIEGLER (22nd June1910 - 13th October 2003)

On the occasion of the thirteenth anniversary of the death of Anne Ziegler (Tuesday 13 October 2003) I am posting a picture of her posing as Mrs Siddons in the famous Gainsborough painting. This photograph first appeared in The Star (Johannesburg) in 1962.

Hear Anne singing in Noel Coward Vocal Gems (1947)



                                                Anne as principal boy in panto.

13 OCTOBER is the anniversary of the death of Anne Ziegler in Penrhyn Bay, Llandudno, North Wales. It seems no time since I received the sad phone call from her friend, Sally Rayner to let me know that Anne had passed away. Anne had a bad fall in her home in Penrhyn Bay, North Wales on 8 August 2003 and spent the last few months of her life in  hospital. She died on 13 October, 2003, at the age of 93.

 I am posting this beautiful photograph of Anne dressed in a rose-trimmed crinoline. During Anne's singing career in the UK in the days of fame and glory during the forties and early fifties, Anne was noted for the beautiful crinolines she wore in the Variety act with her husband, the renowned British tenor, Webster Booth, and in stage and film performances. The gown in this photograph is an excellent example and the roses allude to Anne and Webster's signature tune, Only a Rose from The Vagabond King. The couple starred in a revival of this Rudolf Friml musical at the Winter Garden Theatre in 1943.



While the generation who remembers Anne and Webster from those far-off days is growing smaller with the passing years, I hope new generations will discover them by listening to their recordings, many of which are available on CD. I have uploaded a number of rare 78 rpm recordings by Anne and Webster on YOU TUBE, and you may listen to these by clicking on the links to the right, or go directly to Duettist's YouTube channel. Anne did not make many solo recordings, but Webster made recordings of oratorio, opera, ballads, musicals and art songs as well as medleys and duets with other singers as well as numerous duet recordings with Anne.

There is a group on Facebook dedicated to the lives, recordings, photos and careers of Anne and Webster. Many of their 78rpm recordings have been perfectly restored by Mike Taylor, the co-administrator of the group. We have 83 members at present and would welcome anyone who is interested in the couple. Click on the link below to join our group.


 The Golden Age of Webster Booth-Anne Ziegler and Friends

Jean Collen - 12th October 2016.

Thursday, May 05, 2016

DUET by Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler

I have digitised Duet, the autobiography of Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler, published by Stanley Paul in 1951. It is available by direct link as an e-book and paperback. 


The introduction reads as follows:

England's most popular duettists, who have sung in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and America, and are loved by millions of radio fans, have written their love-story together.

The provincial choirboy and the little Liverpool pianist have come a long way. Webster Booth ran away from an accountant's stool to tour England at £4 a week and sing on the piers. Anne Ziegler's father was ruined on the cotton market, so she sang in restaurant cabaret. They met playing the lovers in "Faust" - and fell in love. But he was married already.

Concert-party struggles, pantomime rivalries, fun and peril in early films, adventures at Savoy Hill and parts in stage "flops" were followed by great successes. She was hailed as "Radio's Nightingale", and as a leading lady in New York and London, a film star and BBC favourite. He sang at the Albert Hall and Covent Garden, starred in the West End and on films and radio. They went half round the world together, singing.

There are two-fisted criticisms and fascinating glimpses behind the scenes in film-land, stage-land and the mad and magic world of music. The authors laugh at themselves, each other and the world as they take you with them - this boy and girl who made good in one of real life's most moving romances.



The links are as follows:

E-book:


Paperback:

DUET by Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler

John Marwood, a member of The Golden Age of WebsterBooth-Anne Ziegler and Friends group on Facebook wrote the following interesting review of the book:

I’ve just read ‘Duet’, Anne Ziegler and Webster Booth’s autobiography, published by Stanley Paul & Co. in 1951.
My plan was to read it over several days, but once I’d started, I could not put it down.
In the opening chapter Webster says that ‘Someone must begin even a duet. The die is cast and I am the victim - though, no doubt, the ladies will have the last word!’
The first chapter and all subsequent odd numbers are simply headed ’Webster’; and all the even ones are headed ‘Anne’.
The last chapter of the 25 is headed ‘Webster and Anne’; and so the autobiography ends neatly with a joint effort - a duet.
The remark by Webster about ladies sets the tone. It is light, witty and amusing. There is no chapter without entertaining anecdotes.
Apparently the book was ghost-written by the late Frank S. Stuart [Frank Stanley Stuart]. Frank was adept at presenting amusing tales that were based on factual events. Mention is made of precise events in diaries, so I imagine both characters lent their diaries to the writer and spent many hours relating tales, adventures and anecdotes about the past. The two personae sound entirely plausible.
I was surprised by the strong anti-war remarks in the book; and it seems the ghost-writer was a pacifist. Apparently Webster and Anne were not happy with these remarks, and it seems surprising that the publisher allowed them to remain. Only 6 years after the end of the terrible world conflagration many readers must have felt uncomfortable about some of these remarks.
The book was published 5 years before the couple left for South Africa. It is pity we never get to hear them speaking about their years there, but perhaps 1951 was when they were at the peak of their fame. We read of the couple's delight to be told that Queen Mary had herself picked out their act as a favourite one which she wished to hear at a Gala Variety to mark her eightieth birthday. We read of other encounters with the royal family.
It is a tale of fun and glamour, tails and crinolines, a most entertaining story - a must-read for everyone who remembers the couple, or for anyone who has just discovered them recently.
John Marwood

I may add that John Marwood proofread the digitised book most meticulously and I am extremely grateful to him for his help.

Jean Collen 5 May 2016.



DuetDuet by Anne Ziegler
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler were my singing teachers in Johannesburg. While I was studying with them I acted as Webster's studio accompanist when Anne (who usually played the piano for students) had other engagements. We became good friends, a friendship which lasted until they died - Webster in 1984, and Anne in 2003.

I first read "Duet" when Webster brought it into the studio and gave it to me to read. I was fascinated by the lively story of their rise to fame, their romance which was fraught with difficulties because Webster was married to Paddy Prior already, and their popularity as duettists during the forties and early fifties.

This book was written when they were at the height of their fame, some years before they had income tax difficulties and eventually moved to South Africa in 1956. Perhaps it was as well that the book ended before they experienced any hardship.

I have always tried to keep Anne and Webster's singing and illustrious careers before the public. I am sure that anyone who reads their autobiography will get a good idea of their charming personalities from reading this fascinating book. Several people who have read it recently, have described it as "unputdownable". I hope whoever reads this review and is tempted to read the book will share that opinion of it!


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